My MS Story (Part 2)

Just three months after I was sick and dizzy with double vision and constant vertigo, it happened again.

It came on this time much more aggressive than the first time. However, having made so much progress when I went back to work last time, I took a week off work again, but didn’t bother going to the doctor or getting a sick note.

Despite feeling dreadful, I dragged myself back into work. As far as I was concerned, I’d had a viral infection a few months earlier, and perhaps I hadn’t shaken it off properly so it reared it’s head again.

Once again, I was back wearing my glasses, and fortunately I hadn’t thrown out the prism that had corrected my vision the first time around.

This time, my “episode” lasted around 5 weeks – so a touch shorter than the first time.

The rugby league season started again during this episode – and I wasn’t to be put off going to see my boys in Cherry and White.

I should have stayed at home. It was horrendous. Getting into the stand was particularly bad as there was no hand rail. Along with everything else that had gone wrong with me, my balance was pretty questionable. I spent the whole match feeling sick, and struggled to even see what was happening really.

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Don’t be fooled by the smile – I felt HORRENDOUS!

Like last time once I’d recovered, I didn’t think of it any more and that was the end of it.

That was the last of any serious relapses that I remember for a couple of years at that point. I was still experiencing the tingling in my legs that had started a few years earlier. I’d grown so used to it though, that I didn’t even notice it anymore.  It would come in waves of severity. Even to this day, I still experience it, but it’s never pain. It’s not even discomfort. I can’t even say it’s annoying. I described it to my Neurologist as like someone had put a Berocca in my leg (pretty sure it’s the first time she’s heard that) and I made a friend laugh the other day when I said it just feels effervescent. He’s confident that no-one has ever described a symptom of MS in such a positive way, and if I’m honest, I’m inclined to believe him!

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